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years since the economy collapsed most traditional americans have been focused on the immediate and urgent children is the economy, unemployment. am i going to lose my job is my house under water either figuratively with my mortgage or literally with hurricane sandy. >> liberal americans are focused in on that too. >> when most traditional americans are focused on their jobs, their families, their lives, the bigger economic picture. >> bill: you are wrong about that because they have the same economic concerns but yet same to harness their energy in the ideology. >> here is the difference. the left wing focuses 24/7. they never rest on mission of secular progress transformation whether it's america or europe. >> bill: i agree with that. >> they never rest. traditional americans have lives, they have jobs. >> wait a second. >> they are less focused on the cultural side of things than they are about community. >> liberals don't have jobs. you are talking as if tradition is is opposition to liberalism as if you are a liberal therefore you don't respect or honor tradition. that's ab
that the slaves produced for their masters and that made up the core of the southern economy. and only slave labor, only the labor of people who were owned outright by their owners, by landowners who had no right to object, much less to refuse the conditions under which they were compelled to work, only slave labor would cultivate those crops intensively and cheaply enough to yield the tremendous profits that they did. slavery's importance to the southern elite was not simply a matter of dollars and cents. to many masters, as slave owners liked to be called, slavery appeared to be an essential, even an irreplaceable fixture of society. it was inseparable from everything that they knew and loved. it was inseparable from all aspects of what they refer to as their way of life. of course, economically but also socially and culturally. slavery was the unique basis of the particular outlook, the assumptions, the norms, the habits, the relationships to which these masters had become deeply and reflectsively attached -- reflectsively attached. it defined their culture, it shaped their religion, it even sh
job creation and the american economy. today we will hear from s.e.c. commissioner danny gallagher who i think is well-positioned to lay out an agenda for this in the next year. we hope this is an agenda that can attract strong bipartisan support. mr. gallagher brings a unique combination of backgrounds. he started as general counsel for a financial services firm. then joined the staff of commissioner paul atkins and worked for commissioner, worked for the -- at the f.c.c. as deputy director and then acting director in one of the largest divisions. he's been on the senior professional staff, then was in private practice and about 14 months ago was confirmed by the u.s. senate as securities and exchange commission commissioner. i think everybody who who knows him will know several things about him. he is smart, he understands the complex issues. second, he is -- he has an ability to see another person's perspective and find consensus and make forward progress on issues and understands that you can achieve consensus while still remaining true to principle and finally that he is a great p
in an effort to fight lower enrollment rates due to the bad economy. is this trend going to continue? joining us to talk about it is university maryland economist peter morris se789. half of the declines, why are more young are deciding to forgo college education? >> the cost have jumped a lot and the graduates can't find jobs. there is a sense that it doesn't pay out. you get set with a lot of big loans and join the service, learn a trade. go to a community college and skip university all together. >> gregg: president obama wants everybody to go to college? >> it doesn't pay out. most stated universities offer diplomas that don't lead to a marketable skill. there are too many graduates working at starbucks these days. >> gregg: "wall street journal" analyzed this way. take a look at this. facing stagnant family income, shaky job prospects and a smaller pool of high school graduates, more schools are reining in tuition costs. is it possible that some tuition costs may actually go down, or we simply talking about slowing the rate of increase? >> i think it's slowing the rate of increase. it's
promises. or helping the economy. how did you weigh those? when he makes a promise on the plus side, does he get a plus on at 500 or does he get a negative? the net -- the next time, does he get guest: we have a category called obama's top promises. you can look at those and you can see that i think his record of fulfilling them is not quite as high as overall. you make a good point -- some of his promises were sweeping and thematic and others were very specific. there were two that were lighthearted -- we included two promises like that. one was his promise during the campaign that he would buy his daughter as a puppy which is a promise kept in the other was that he would fight for a college football playoff system which we also raided a promise kept indeed, you could say this is the aggregate and you need to look in on the more narrow numbers. we published an article yesterday but we welcome anybody who wants to tally them up in different ways and provide an analysis. all promises are not created equal. host: we are looking at the top promises on politifact - tell us more about compromi
and mathematics backgrounds to stay in the u.s., use those skills to grow our economy, help our country, rather than go back to their home country. host: the white house sees hope for bipartisan deal on immigration based on what senator marco rubio of florida, republican, has put out there. he's put some ideas out there. do you -- do you endorse liz ideas? guest: i have not spoken to senator rubio yet, but we welcome those ideas. there are others in the house that are working on specific proposals and wider ranging proposals, and we want to take a look at this. you know, we are a nation of immigrants. there is not a person to be found who's a u.s. citizen who can't go back a few generations or several generations and find someone in their family who came to the united states to better their lives. my grandfather came from germany. my wife's parents came from ireland. this is a very, very common thing. we are also a nation of laws. so finding a way to address this issue and fix a very broken immigration system will entail looking at a lot of different pieces of this, including enforcement and wh
, it's critically important and timely. >> the greatest challenge the american economy has is the american congress. >> you know, it is. it really is, if you look at what's happening out there. and i've been saying this. and you guys have been saying it, too. because you go out and you talk to americans and they're discouraged by what's going on. and you say, wait a second. guys, we're in a century right now with the most technologically advanced country with the greatest universities, the greatest schools, we're going to win. >> that's right. >> even the chinese say america has eight out of the top ten universities on the planet. as you said, we've got energy. and you know this better than anybody else. there have been surveys. you ask chinese students what their biggest complaint about their education is, and they go, that our teachers don't teach us how to think like americans. >> that's right. >> they're crazy, those americans, and we want to have some of that. and you talk about -- you talk about this energy revolution, and americans need to hear this. >> it's right th
. the 2013 ram 1500 with best-in-class fuel economy. engineered to move heaven and earth. guts. glory. ram. the new ram 1500. motor trend's 2013 truck of the year. >> welcome back. we're coming to you this morning live from newtown, connecticut. today marks one month since the tragic shootings that took so many young lives and so many lives overall. vice president joe biden is going to be meeting with the house of representatives, and finalize the recommendations that he'll give based on meetings that he has had with his gun task force and groups across the country. he is expected to recommend a couple of things. universal background checks and limiting high capacity magazines as well as encouraging more research into links between violent media and gun violence. >> first of all, it's sobering to be in this place here at this time. i just want to say that. i think the president is going to be more aggressive here in his second term on this. i mean, gun control is an issue that divides the country very closely. i think almost exactly in half. the reality is that the half of the country that
and weak economies. back to you. >> mary thompson of the new york stock exchange. thank you. what is more incredible than a spectator at a basketball game sinking a half-court shot? check out what happened when atlanta hawk fan kevin went for the thousand dollar prize at half time. as you see, the ball got wedged there right between the backboard and the rim. kevin, though, did win the thousand dollars because the shot was so unbelievable, and technically the ball did make it into the basket when a hawk staffer then yanked on the net. >> go back to the beginning of that. technically, savannah just pointed out he shouldn't have gotten the money because he stepped over the line at half-court. watch closely. there, right there. i would have given it to him, savannah. >> i think we all know that i would have given it to him. just for showing up, i would have given him the thousand bucks. let's get to dylan dryer who is in for al. what a mess on the east coast this morning. >> such a mess. commuters dealing with rain, ice, sleet. we have snow across new england. it is going to be messy through
Search Results 0 to 8 of about 9